Quick Jambalaya

  • YIELD: 2 to 4 servings
  • TIME: 35 minutes

This recipe makes quick work out of jambalaya by using leftover rice, and it tastes great with freshly cooked grains, too. To make this meal meatless, use vegan andouille sausage or stick with pork sausage, if you prefer. Either option, along with creole seasoning and the classic trinity of creole cooking — onion, celery and green bell pepper — result in a dish that is unmistakably Louisianan. Though many jambalaya recipes skip tomatoes, this version uses a blend of tomato paste and diced tomatoes to add bulk, and an acidity that helps lighten up the otherwise hearty one-pot meal.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 medium yellow onion, diced
  • 2 links pork or andouille or chorizo sausage (6 ounces), cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 2 celery stalks, thinly sliced
  • 1 green bell pepper, diced
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 2 cups cooked long-grain white rice
  • 1 tablespoon creole seasoning
  •  Salt and black pepper
  • 1 (15-ounce) can diced tomatoes
  • 1 tablespoon hot sauce, plus more for serving
  • 2 tablespoons sliced scallions

PREPARATION

  1. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over medium. Add the onion and cook, stirring often, until softened, 5 to 7 minutes. Add the sausage and cook until starting to brown, about 5 minutes.
  2. Add the remaining tablespoon oil, then add the celery and bell pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, 5 to 7 minutes. Stir in the garlic and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Stir in the tomato paste and cook until very fragrant, about 1 minute.
  3. Reduce the heat to low and add the cooked rice. Sprinkle with the creole seasoning and 1/2 teaspoon each salt and pepper. Stir in the tomatoes and hot sauce and cook until warmed through. Season with additional salt and pepper as needed. Garnish with the scallions and serve with more hot sauce.

TIP

  • This recipe is a great use of leftover cooked rice, but if you are making the rice from scratch, cook the grains in vegetable stock with 2 teaspoons creole or Cajun seasoning for an extra kick of flavor.

SOURCE

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1022928-quick-jambalaya

Khoresh-e Ghormeh Sabzi (Persian Herb, Bean and Lamb Stew)

  • YIELD: 6 to 8 servings
  • TIME: 4 hours

There are three essential elements to this khoresh, or stew, which is often called Iran’s national dish. First, the sweet, pungent flavor of dried or fresh fenugreek leaves defines the stew, which simply isn’t the same without it. Likewise, Omani limes (also known as dried Persian limes) add a distinct aged sourness that is vital to the dish. Finally, the classic Persian technique of sautéing a mountain of finely minced herbs lends character and complexity to the foundation of the stew. Don’t be afraid to really cook down the herbs until quite dark and dry; this step is essential to concentrate their flavor.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 ½ pounds lamb shoulder or beef chuck, trimmed and cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 1 heaping teaspoon ground turmeric
  •  Fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • ½ cup dried kidney beans
  • 3 tablespoons plus 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 large yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 pound Italian parsley (about 3 large bunches)
  • 1 pound cilantro (about 3 large bunches)
  • 2 bunches chives
  • 1 bunch scallions, roots trimmed
  • 1 tablespoon dried fenugreek leaves
  • 4 Omani (dried Persian) limes, rinsed and punctured multiple times with a fork
  • ¼ teaspoon crumbled saffron threads
  •  Polo Ba Tahdig (Persian Rice With Bread Crust), for serving
  •  Mast-o Khiar or plain yogurt, for serving

PREPARATION

  1. In a medium bowl, season the meat with turmeric, 2 teaspoons salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Set aside.
  2. Rinse the beans and place in a medium bowl with 1 cup water and a generous pinch of salt. Set aside to soak for 30 minutes.
  3. In the meantime, place a large Dutch oven or similar pot over medium-high heat. Add 3 tablespoons oil. When it shimmers, add meat and cook, turning regularly so that it browns evenly on all sides, about 15 minutes. Once the meat has browned, move it to the edges of the pot and add the onion to the center of the pot, along with a generous pinch of salt. Cook, stirring regularly, until the onion begins to soften and turn brown, 8 to 10 minutes.
  4. Drain the beans and add to the pot, stirring to combine everything and coat the beans with oil. Add 4 cups water, increase heat to high and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover pot and simmer for 2 hours.
  5. In the meantime, prepare the herbs: Wash parsley and cilantro, then use a salad spinner to dry very well. Remove and discard the tough stems. Chop the leaves and tender stems very, very finely, or feel free to use a food processor to get these herbs as finely chopped as possible. The more finely chopped the herbs, the more green and unctuous the ghormeh sabzi will be.
  6. Separately chop the chives and entire bunch of scallions (including the green tops) as finely as possible by hand. These, too, must be very finely chopped — nearly minced — but they will turn to mush in a food processor and thus should be chopped by hand.
  7. Set a large frying pan over medium heat. When the pan is hot, add the remaining 1/4 cup oil and the scallion-chive mixture. Allow to wilt, stirring constantly, for about 2 minutes, then add remaining chopped herbs and fenugreek leaves, crushing the fenugreek leaves between your fingers as you add them. Cook, stirring continuously, until the herbs are wilted and very dark green — but not burned — and they give off a bright green oil when pressed with a spoon, 18 to 20 minutes. This step is crucial to the flavor and color of the stew. You’ll know the herbs are ready when they feel dry and emit a strong, savory aroma.
  8. When the meat has cooked for 2 hours, add the cooked herb mixture, Omani limes and 1/2 cup water. Season with salt and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover pot, and simmer for another hour. Check on the limes occasionally to make sure they are submerged in the stew but not falling apart. Gently push them into the stew if they’re still floating after 20 minutes.
  9. As the stew nears the 3-hour mark, remove the lid and check the meat; it should be very tender. If the ghormeh sabzi seems a little watery, leave it uncovered for the last 20 minutes of cooking and allow to reduce into a thick stew. Taste and adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper. If the stew needs a little acidity, juice a lime into the stew through a sieve by pressing down on it with a spoon (avoid letting the seeds through the sieve, as they can be bitter). Set aside. Taste the stew and continue adding more lime juice until the stew is sufficiently tangy. Stir in the saffron. The stew should be a very deep, dark shade of green and quite thick when done. Return dried limes into the stew to serve.
  10. Serve hot with Persian rice and mast-o khiar.

SOURCE

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1020209-khoresh-e-ghormeh-sabzi-persian-herb-bean-and-lamb-stew

Brodo di Pollo con Pastina (Chicken Soup With Pastina)

  • YIELD: 6 servings
  • TIME: 1 hour 10 minutes

Pastina means “tiny pasta,” and it’s often the first pasta shape Italian children are introduced to, typically cooked in broth. Pastina comes in a variety of shapes, like little stars and rounds. For this recipe, you can use any tiny shape you like, or use noodles broken into small pieces. Typically, the pastina is precooked in a separate pot and added to each soup bowl alongside shredded chicken, but this version cooks everything together for an easy one-pot meal. And this comforting chicken soup does not require premade or even store-bought broth: Instead, boneless, skinless chicken breasts cook in water with aromatics like onion, carrots, celery and garlic — and a good drizzle of olive oil — for a rich, flavorful broth that comes together fairly quickly.

Brodo di Pollo con Pastina (Chicken Soup With Pastina)

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 large boneless, skinless chicken breasts (about 1 pound)
  • 1 large yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons kosher salt (Diamond Crystal), or to taste
  • ½ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • 3 large carrots, peeled and sliced into ¼-inch half moons
  • 3 large celery ribs, sliced into ¼-inch half moons
  • 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 teaspoons tomato paste
  • ½ cup pastina, such as Acini di Pepe, or orzo (about 4 ounces)
  • ½ cup finely chopped parsley
  •  Grated Parmesan, for serving

PREPARATION

  1. Place the chicken and 10 cups of water in a large pot. Partly cover and bring to a boil over high heat, keeping a close eye so that it doesn’t overflow and skimming off any foam that rises to the top.
  2. Add the onion, olive oil, salt, garlic powder and pepper; stir and allow to come back up to a gentle boil. Cover completely, reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for 10 minutes. Add the carrots, celery, garlic and tomato paste, stirring to incorporate the tomato paste. I ncrease the heat to high and allow to come back up to a gentle boil. Cover, reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Taste and season with more salt and pepper as desired.
  3. Remove the cooked chicken and place in a large bowl. Add the pastina to the soup, stir and increase the heat to high and allow to come back up to a gentle boil. Cover, reduce the heat to medium-low and cook the pasta according to the package instructions for al dente, stirring occasionally.
  4. While the pasta cooks, shred the chicken with a fork. Add the shredded chicken and parsley to the soup, stir, cover and simmer for 2 minutes. Serve topped with grated Parmesan.

SOURCE

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1022969-brodo-di-pollo-con-pastina-chicken-soup-with-pastina

LESSONS LEARNED

  • Too much chicken. Go with one breast, skinless.
  • Very tasty soup

Classic French 75

Drinkers who know and love the French 75 have strong personal preference on whether to use gin or cognac as the base. This classic recipe offers both options. Pour what you like, or, if you’re on the fence, let season or mood determine your choice. Gin tends toward a cleaner, more botanical, refreshing drink, ideal for warmer weather drinking; cognac lends heft and weight, especially great in cooler weather.

Classic French 75

INGREDIENTS

PREPARATION

  1. In an ice-filled shaker, combine the gin or cognac, lemon juice and simple syrup or shrub.
  2. Cover and shake vigorously until well chilled.
  3. Strain into a Champagne or coupe glass and top with Champagne.
  4. Finish with a lemon twist.

SOURCE

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1022922-classic-french-75

Memphis Dry Rub from Hey Grill Hey

My recipe for Memphis Dry Rub is the ultimate rub to provide a balance of sweet and salty flavors to your smoked meats. Nine herbs and spices come together to make for a rub that holds its own without overpowering that gorgeous smoky flavor.

Ingredients

  • 3 Tablespoons smoked paprika
  • 3 Tablespoons kosher salt
  • 1 Tablespoon black pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 2 teaspoons onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 1 teaspoon celery seed
  • 1 teaspoon mustard powder

Instructions

  1. Make the Memphis Dry Rub. Combine all ingredients in a medium bowl and stir well to combine. Use a fork or a whisk to break up any large clumps.
  2. Store in an airtight container. Store unused rub in an airtight container for several weeks.

Source

https://heygrillhey.com/memphis-dry-rub/

Louise’s Tourtiere

Ingredients

  • Equal portion of ground beef, pork, and veal (not always available and expensive so don’t always include it)
  • Chopped onion
  • A little mustard (your choice)
  • Salt, pepper, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg
  • A little maple syrup or maple sugar flakes

Directions

  1. I drain some of the fat before putting into pie plate so its not to muchy!
  2. Add pie cover and make sure you make at least one big opening (a quarter) or several small slivers before baking.
  3. You can freeze pies and simply warm them up when you want one.

Baked Black Grouper Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 pound black grouper
  • cooking oil
  • seafood seasoning, such as Old Bay seasoning

Directions

  1. Coat the baking pan with spray cooking oil, vegetable oil, or olive oil.
  2. Place cleaned fillets on the pan and season to taste with seafood seasoning.
  3. Place in an oven preheated to 400°F.
  4. Bake the fish for approximately 10 minutes per inch of thickness. Fish will be flaky when done.

Lessons Learned

  • I baked only 10 minutes and had to go back in the oven twice. I missed the “per inch of thickness” part. Should have just gone 20 minutes.

Source

https://www.recipetips.com/recipe-cards/u–3943/baked-black-grouper.asp

Roasted Peppers & Onions

Roasted peppers and onions complement just about everything from grilled and roasted meats to seafood. This easy low-carb side dish, with its vibrant color and simple flavor, is sure to become a staple.

Ingredients

  • 1 medium red bell pepper, sliced
  • 2 medium yellow bell peppers, sliced
  • 1 medium orange bell pepper, sliced
  • 1 large red onion, cut into 12 wedges
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon ground pepper
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 2 tablespoons roughly chopped fresh basil

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Place bell peppers and onion in a large bowl. Add oil, salt and pepper; toss to coat.
  2. Spread the vegetables in a single layer on a large rimmed baking sheet. Bake until tender and charred in spots, 20 to 25 minutes.
  3. Transfer the vegetables to a large serving bowl. Toss with lemon juice, parsley and basil. Serve immediately.

Lessons Learned

  • Brilliant!
  • Simple and easy and delicious and just used some oil and a pinch of salt

Vieux Carré

Ingredients:

Instructions:

  1. Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass.
  2. Add ice, then stir until chilled.
  3. Strain into a rocks glass over a single large piece of ice.
  4. Garnish with an orange peel. 

Source:

https://cocktailswithsuderman.substack.com/p/a-rum-and-allspice-swapped-vieux